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Money Monster

Lee Gates is the host of a TV show that deals with finance, said the trend of the stock market and recommends investments, all in a ridiculous and yelled climate, made of entr’actes with the dancers in sequins and jingle to the vulgar limit. After all, the money you can earn or lose viewers, Gates does not care. At least until a young investor, Kyle Budwell, who lost everything he had, breaks in transmission, barricades himself in the studio during a live, him pointing a gun to his head and forced him into a vest packed with explosives.
From that moment, that day, part of a program other than that of all the other days, in which the only possibility that the void Gates to stay alive is linked to the fact of giving the attacker the answers, to understand him, and with those who work behind the door to save him, what happened and who is responsible. In short, it seems to say Jodie Foster, to make good television journalism must really be forced, under threat of death. Jokes? Only partially. The shadow of cynicism that passes through the film, and that it closes as it closes, is in fact its brightest part, the better.
Drawn from a screenplay engaged in a highly topical theme, the director Foster also identifies in it the possibility of building a movie almost in real time, which throws a bridge between two worlds, that of the few who are inside the small screen and the large number who stand in front of the great illusion and stories that approaches those who produce a media story (Tizza) and to those who live the daily life: an illusion, a trick often, similar to that increasingly virtual transits of modern financial capital.
The relationship between Lee Gates and his director Patty Fenn based on the production of Will McAvoy and his executive producer MacKenzie McHale, dell’ultracitato The Newsroom sorkiano, while, in terms of image, the filmmaker brings back something of his experience d ‘ performer on the set of Spike Lee’s Inside Man. and yet there are neither writing nor Lee Sorkin director: the film comes after their explorations and is a genre, here, when the arrive late, even slightly, not pay. If you add that one of the main characters, namely to Kyle, instead of being the truest is the least credible, you can stop chasing perfection and enjoy an entertaining film that, despite some ingenuity, has the merit of placing more than a good joke at the right point and the virtue of offering a nice role to Clooney. It is precisely he and Roberts to do the best job: Clooney at depicting the parable of an idiot who turns out to do the right thing (exaggerated parable in itself but managed with great skill) and she let him in the shoulder.



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