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Passengers

On board the starship Avalon is taking the largest mass migration from Earth to a colony to be built and live on a new planet, Homestead II. Five thousand people are traveling sleeping in the forefront capsules. During the match with a meteorite, however, the ship reported an unexpected accident and a capsule is released. Jim wakes up, so, with ninety years ahead of schedule. Then it’s time for Aurora. Alone, with no possibility of turning back, the two are doomed to end their lives on Avalon. But the ship is damaged and to risk their lives now are many more.
The spatial coordinates of Passengers seem to be situated somewhere between Wall-E and Gravity, in a place where time has made his rounds and the future is a return to the Adamic couple and puts his hope in a new leaf, the symbol of establishment superiority, however fragile and mortal sull’inanimato. Those who follow this route will find a packed movie not to upset anyone, and intended, therefore, does not impress anyone.
Noiosetto like a super luxury cruise once you have already explored and experienced all environments, this film fails to maintain the level of interest aroused by the first twist (predictable but nonetheless intriguing, a moral bell’interrogativo) and must cling to handholds offered by the clichés of the genre, to resume philosophical inspiration only in the final, in a much more cursory and superficial. But there is another way to get to the same goal, which crosses the Titanic with a romance novel and discovers the departing cards: Passengers in science fiction is a backdrop, an exotic, what matters is the romance between the mechanic third class and New Yorker writer who has embarked groped for the publishing coup, the love story between Chris Pratt, who is not afraid of hard feelings, and Jennifer Lawrence, the sexy icon by increased resistance force.
Despite the technical prowess and beauty sporadic but real of certain scenes, such as the lack of gravity in the pool, the Tyldum film should be taken with a smile, recommending eyes and brain to light. Otherwise, too many are the points that do not add up and nothing short of appearing ridiculous costumes and environments. Better to see the prison ship as a metaphor of marriage, with his habits and his doubts Hamlet, the twist of fate and life-saving possibility of dedicating themselves to gardening.



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